Nanzan in a Nutshell [Final Report]

日本での留学生活を送る中で時間が立つのが速いと実感するようになった。

It was when I was studying for my Japanese for Communication final that I rediscovered this example sentence I had written for homework. Y’know, one of those sentences that you write because it’s appropriately cheesy at the beginning of the year when you’re taking the ‘studying abroad for a whole semester’ pill with a bite of bread to help the medicine go down. It’s terribly ironic that now at the end of a long and terribly slow semester I look back at this sentence and realize how true it is. Bags are being packed; Goodbye parties are being partied; finals are being written; parting tears are being cried. With the end of my semester at Nanzan comes the obligatory reflection post.

In previous posts, I might have dragged Nanzan’s classes a little bit because the teaching style and speed may not be what I’m accustomed to at Yale, but I’m realizing this might not be an entirely fair comparison. Just because classes weren’t what I expected doesn’t mean they were completely ineffective; there were definitely pros and cons to every class and instructor. The weight of those pros and cons could be different per person, so I want to take this time to talk about Nanzan Japanese and elective classes more objectively, drawing on my own personal experiences/observations as well as feedback from other Nanzan students.

Nanzan’s Japanese classes are labelled as intensive because students cover a year’s worth of material in one semester, but what’s considered “a year’s worth of material” varies by college. According to a friend of mine, the general consensus among Nanzan students is that Nanzan Japanese classes are markedly more difficult than those at their home universities. Whether it be purely the length of the classes themselves or the actual content is unclear, so I’ll just talk about the general layout of classes and let you judge for yourself.

I was placed in NIJ 600, the second highest level offered, appropriate for students approximately at the JLPT N2 level. NIJ 610: Japanese for Communication covered five different readings on topics based around issues in modern Japanese society including the absence of fathers in Japanese homes (always work work work), welfare and healthcare, and environmental issues. Some of these were editorials or actual newspaper articles from the 90s (Would’ve been more relevant with recent material, but I digress). Each chapter, we did prep homework where we looked up background information relevant to the reading or wrote our own opinions or what we knew about our own countries’ policies. This also was a chance for us to get familiar with the vocabulary and grammar that would appear in the reading. We had grammar practice every chapter, where we would write example sentences and go over them as a class. Then we went through the reading sentence by sentence with the professor asking clarifying questions and giving us the opportunity to pose our own questions. Usually by doing this in-depth reading, we could fix our reading comprehension homework before turning it in if we made a mistake. Some readings were supplemented with videos, clips or recommended websites or extra newspaper articles, and we did debates or group presentations to learn how to express our own opinions on the issue in Japanese. The class was very structured, almost to a point where it was irritating. The debates weren’t spontaneous or natural discussion, rather each person on a team talked about a particular point using suggested key words and ideas during a time limit. There was a specific time for posing questions and for one side to refute the opponent’s point and no clear winner. Even in answering homework or test questions, if the answer wasn’t posed exactly how the professors wanted it or how they answered it in class, it was marked as incorrect. (Just to throw a little salt in here: I was told that an answer that was marked correct on my homework assignment would be considered incorrect if I answered the exact same question the same way on the test. And what kind of sense does that make? Exactly, it doesn’t. Okay, that’s my little pinch of salt to the recipe. Moving on.)

NIJ 620 is the class focused on reading and writing. This class was less structured and repetitive than 610, but this could simply be a difference in the professors’ teaching styles. The readings were more geared towards literature and personal essays than the ones in 610 and in my opinion, much easier to digest. Despite reading comprehension being the backbone of the class, we spend a great deal of time reviewing basic grammar points and addressing mistakes in common grammar usage. This was actually very helpful because we teased out the differences between は and  が, and found out linguistic motivations for what appears to be a silly distinction. We spent time learning new ways to study kanji (by origin, groups of meaning, and radicals) and learned the formats for emails and letters in Japanese (yes, there are numerous rules and etiquette when it comes to this too.) Overall, it was a fun class with a lively teacher that everyone seemed to like, even if it lacked the structure and good planning of the 610 class.

I thought this might be unique to my NIJ 610 teacher (who was the least favorite of the 600 level teachers, but that’s a topic for another day), but Nanzan Japanese teachers can be strict and inconsistent when it comes to grading, which just confused students at all levels. Some other students had things marked incorrect on a test that were marked correct on homework, or the same answers were marked as correct and incorrect, depending on the student. When students asked about these discrepancies, they were either told to look up the answers themselves or given some vague response like “both answers work, so don’t worry about it.” As far as I heard, mistakes with grades were never corrected, instead it was the student’s responsibility to “think a little harder.”  Though the teaching is in-depth, my general impression is that the teachers want to stick to the book at all costs, a golden reward that all students are to strive for absolute perfection through memorization and regurgitating what was taught. If you can’t do that, you will be cheerfully and politely left behind. Between this and the rigid structure of the classes, many American students just seemed done with Nanzan right around midterms. Depends on the type of teaching style you’re used to/whatever works for you, I suppose.

There are a number of elective classes to take: from academic Japanese, to Japanese culture/society classes to the arts, and I can hardly speak for the teaching style of all of them. The workload also varies, so just take the time to read the syllabus at the beginning of the semester or ask someone who’s taken the class previously. Since most of these classes meet for a huge chunk of time once a week, the teaching was less in-depth since we only spent once class on one topic and we had so much to cover by the end of the semester. Some teachers talked in technical terms without explaining in-depth, causing more confusion for students than necessary, and some teachers lost their lectures in story-telling so we were all confused about what we were actually learning, but some managed to find a balance. Either way, grading for these classes was overall significantly less strict than the Japanese language classes–any homework was taken purely for completion and a lot of mistakes were allowed to slide. Because of infrequent graded assignments, students had no idea of how the teacher graded or what their expectations were, which caused a bit of anxiety when facing final papers and exams with very vague guidelines.

Outside of the classroom, there are a bunch of clubs and activities for international students to participate in like sports and dance teams. The Japanese students in these groups seem pretty receptive to foreigners joining them (not in my case, but nevertheless) and it’s a great opportunity to practice Japanese outside of the classroom and make Japanese friends to hang out with on the weekends. Be aware that some clubs and circles require a lot of dedication: practices and meetings are particularly long and drawn out close to the school festival, which also happens to be right around midterms.

So, would I recommend Nanzan to another student? Sure, why not. Any problems I encountered were because of my preferences for a certain teaching style, and those issues didn’t keep me from learning– I think my reading comprehension has come a long way from what it used to be; Japanese newspapers and television don’t scare me anymore. If anything, I’m even more motivated to read and write in Japanese than ever, as long as I’m actually interested in the subject matter. If you’re looking to Nanzan to make you completely fluent, then maybe reconsider. Though some students found it intensive, I’ve definitely had worse (er….better?). To be honest, no matter what program you do, it’s up to you to push yourself and practice until you reach the level of fluency you desire. The program alone won’t do it for you, but you could certainly do worse than Nanzan.

 

 

日本語道

南山大学CJSの600が始まる前3ヶ月ぐらい韓国にいたから韓国語のせいで日本語が悪くなったと思いました。大学の授業で一所懸命勉強した漢字の読み方を忘れてしまうこともありました。話し相手が言うことが分かっても自分が考えていることを日本語でちゃんと伝えられなくて困りました。コミュニケーション力について心配していました。日本語の勉強の最初からずっとその問題がありました。

600が始まってから、同級生のみんなの素晴らしい日本語を聞いて、やっぱり私が日本語が苦手でコミュニケーション力がないと実感しました。読み物の内容が難しいというより、授業で細かいところをはっきり説明することや言い換えることは難しかったです。でも先生が質問に答えてくださって、生徒たちに深く考えさせてよかったです。このような勉強で日本能力が急激に上がるはずだろうと思いました。

伸ばしたい得意な部分は聞き取りと読解です。どうやって伸ばすかというと、自然な日本語を聞いたり読んだりことをする方法が良いです。時間があったら興味がある小説を読むつもりでしたが時間がありませんでした。テレビを見たら、漢字が書いてありますし、速い日本語を聞けますし、聞き取りと漢字練習の両方に役に立ちます。毎日ホストファミリーと一緒にテレビを見て私がわからないところを教えてもらいました。直したかった弱い所は二つあります。一つは漢字を書くことで、もう一つは会話です。毎日読み物についての質問に答えたりするから、自然に自分の意見を書けるようになりました。後は宿題のおかげで記憶にする漢字の数が増えてきました。日本語のコミュニケーション力を上げるにはできるだけ日本人と話す必要があります。日本人の友達を作ろうと思うが、なかなか日本人の友達ができないのが現状です。コミュニケーション問題はまだ解決できません。

勉強すればするほどうまくなるとよく言われますが、必ずしもそういうわけではありません。確かに初級か中級だったらそうです。授業で学ぶ単語や文法が日常生活に出てきますのでよく使えてコミュニケーション力が急激に上がります。しかし上級の授業で学ぶ時難しいアカデミックな単語や文法は日常生活に出てこないから、勉強する時間は勉強の結果へと直接結びを付かないことが気がします。大学の授業を取りたくないと思います。授業の勉強が役に立たないと言うわけではない。ただ、興味にあるものを使わなくて、やる気がどんどんなくなります。この上級レベルで大切なのは自分から日本語をぺらぺらになるまで勉強したい気持ちを持つことです。自分からもう一度一人で勉強したらまた日本語を学ぶ理由を探して、夢を叶えるための対策を考えてからやる気を回復します。

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Nope, it’s a Language Plateau!

When I tell people I’ve been studying Japanese for 5 years now, most of them expect me to be fluent. While this can be reasoned away with a short explanation of difficulties of Japanese for English speakers and my meager beginnings, there’s still a little voice in the back of my head whispering, Yes, but shouldn’t you be?

That voice has gotten progressively louder over the past two years as I’ve been taking proper (rigorous) courses in Japanese since freshman year of college and studying abroad in Japan. I took CET Osaka’s fourth year class last summer and passed with flying colors. While my conversational ability and listening comprehension sky-rocketed, my reading comprehension had not improved enough to land me in Yale’s fifth year Japanese class. However I did have a chance to audit the class and it wasn’t that I couldn’t understand the material, but it was that I couldn’t properly express my own opinions on more serious issues such as politics. So, sophomore year I took Yale’s fourth year Japanese class along with those who hadn’t studied abroad (ouch, my pride) in which I also performed relatively well because I invested so much time into memorizing kanji and writing example sentences like a good student. However it became pretty apparent that I was learning kanji and vocabulary to get the grade, not to dedicate those words to memory. I was reading to get the gist so I didn’t look dumb in class, not to deeply understand. I did enough to get by, but not  enough to make permanent improvement. To this I thought, “Well, my attention is so divided because I’m working on so many other classes/projects/clubs. I simply don’t have enough time right now…” It was easy to forgive myself when I was acing the class.

Now I’m studying abroad in Japan yet again and the error of my ways is glaringly apparent. Though technically I’ve taken fourth year Japanese twice I’m stuck in Nanzan’s fourth year Japanese class AGAIN. With people who just started learning Japanese two or three years ago (how do you like that cookin, pride?). I’m not doing poorly, but my performance hardly reflects the time and energy I’ve invested into Japanese thus far. In class I see kanji and grammar structures that I’ve seen before or that I used to know. If I have to learn how to present graphs and charts in Japanese one more time I think I’m gonna scream. I should be able to understand the news with high percent accuracy or give an impromptu speech on a familiar topic in class without it turning to gibberish halfway through.  My language learning experience now is one big deja vu: Haven’t I done this before?! Why haven’t I gotten it?

What am I doing wrong?

It’s sad that it took me this long to realize that I’d hit a language plateau and I’ve probably been stuck on one for the past calendar year despite taking more challenging classes. Thanks to our good friend Google, I learned that I’m not the only one who hit a brick wall in language learning. There are tons of personal blogs posts and academic-sounding articles (with graphs!) from people who have hit the same brick wall but after some self-reflection took a few steps back a deep breath, a nap, a bowl of Wheaties and vaulted themselves over it. I’ll spare you the inspirational details and cheesy motivations (if you want them, click here and here) but by surfing through these websites I’ve found a few useful things:

Japanese language learning has become routine. I have been stuck in a classroom the past two years taking kanji and vocabulary quizzes, reading short stories and articles aloud and answering reading comprehension questions. Sure, teachers are doing their absolute best to vary the material and projects (to include speeches presentations popular media, so on and so forth) and while it was challenging and new at first, once I mastered the motions to get through Japanese class, I figured my Japanese was good enough, so I subconsciously stopped trying to get better.

The general attitude during this “autopilot” mode is: My Japanese is good enough for the teacher and native speakers to understand the gist of what I’m saying, so that’s good enough. This attitude was only cemented last summer when I realized I knew enough Japanese to get by in Japan or watch a movie completely in Japanese. Wasn’t that the goal? No one in Japan expects my Japanese to be perfect and no one is going out of their way to talk to me about deeper topics like international politics, Japan’s aging population or social hierarchy, so why should I bother in the first place? I don’t even talk about those things in English.

Which leads to another good point mentioned in both articles: marginal benefit, and diminishing return: “The law of diminishing returns is actually taken from the field of economics, but when applied to language learning it means something like this: the more effort you put into learning a language over time, the smaller your increases in fluency become. The more time you invest, the smaller your returns on investment become.” (From Lingholic.com)

The Japanese I’ve been learning the last calendar year has been grammar, vocabulary and kanji found in newspapers or academic articles. As great as it is to learn these words for the sake of literacy, I simply don’t use the grammar in everyday conversations and especially because I don’t live in Japan, these are not kanji and vocabulary I would encounter on a daily basis. So I get less use (“return”) out of these words, and I’m more likely to forget them as opposed to basic vocab and grammar structures.  It’s like taking a step forward only to be pushed three or four back. And it sucks.

A lot of people give up at this point, apparently, and I certainly understand why. Every day I ask myself if I really want to continue. Is it necessary for me to be perfectly fluent to land a job? Can’t I just be happy with where I am now?

…But wouldn’t it be a shame to come this far only to stop? I don’t think I could live with myself if I did throw in the towel. I would probably run into this same problem with other languages (like Korean) so it would probably behoove me to learn how to divide and conquer now.

This requires some thinking, planning and re-assessment: I’ve got to rekindle my motivation for learning Japanese, isolate my weaknesses and tackle them one at a time. Find some new study methods. Keep it interesting. Hopefully there will be a series of posts mapping out my divide and conquer strategy. We’ll see.